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Saturday, 1 January

arte, 8.10 a.m.

arte theme day: At the bottom of the earth
City Land Art Special
New Zealand: The Success Story of Kiwi Wine

The vineyards at the majestic Lake Wanaka in New Zealand are in no way inferior to the best growing areas in Europe. On the contrary: one of the best wines in the country is produced here. The vines were brought by Catholic missionaries in the 17th century, and it took a long time for viticulture to become established. It was not until the 1970s that New Zealand winemakers began to produce wines that have long since been appreciated internationally.

Saturday, 1 January

hr television, 9.45 a.m.

Mallorca's quiet sides
Island tours away from the summer hustle and bustle

September is the month of the grape harvest and ideally suited for tasting the local wines. This can be done conventionally in the bodegas, but also in a completely different way during a trip on the "Wine Express", a wooden train on wheels that takes visitors to the vineyard for a tasting.

Sunday, 2 January

ZDF, 10.15 a.m.

Katie Fforde: Gifted Years Feature film, Germany 2014

After surviving cancer, Nel Innes is happy to resume her work at the New York restaurant she runs with husband Marc. But the joy does not last long: Marc, to whom she has been married for almost 20 years, has an affair with patissière Melissa and seems to have stayed with her only because of Nel's illness. Head over heels, she packs her things and flees to her father Gerald's family vineyard. There she experiences another surprise: Gerald wants to sell the estate, which has been in the family for generations, and enjoy the last years of his life with his late love Margret. A buyer has already been found: Jake Carlyle, owner of the large corporation Brandovino, which fills the supermarket shelves of the East Coast with cheap mass-produced wines. Nel decides to buy the winery. However, she has to admit to herself that her physical strength has not yet fully returned. She is also afraid of another outbreak of the disease. But Jake, of all people, makes Nel feel carefree and attractive for the first time in a long time. But Marc doesn't want to throw away their years together either. He offers Nel to sell the restaurant so that the two of them can make a fresh start on the vineyard. Surprisingly for everyone, Nel renounces the winery and returns to Marc in New York. Will the two of them succeed in saving their marriage there? Or must Nel set Marc free in order to become free himself?

Sunday, 2 January

hr television, 10.10 a.m.

The Vintner King (28)
Violent turbulence 39-part television series, Germany/Austria 2006 - 2010

The wine festival in Rust is just around the corner. Georg Plattner, the head of the winegrowers' cooperative, has organised it and, as if by chance, overlooked Thomas Stickler. Thomas sees this as a planned act of malice against him and his business. So he prepares to take countermeasures and organises his own wine tasting with a tombola and other events. The main prize is supposed to be a sightseeing flight in Blasius' small plane, which he uses to scare away the birds before the grape harvest.

Sunday, 2 January

3sat, 10.25 a.m.

Switzerland's dreamy railway lines
In the "Goldenpass Belle Époque" from Montreux to the Bernese Oberland

Twice a day, the train travels from the palm-fringed shore in Montreux to Zweisimmen in the Bernese Oberland. To do so, it winds its way through the vineyards of picturesque Lavaux.

Sunday, 2 January

3sat, 12.05 p.m.

Switzerland's dreamy railway lines
From the Dreiseenland through the Lavaux to Geneva

From the Dreiseenland, the train travels south to the idyllic Lavaux, Switzerland's most famous wine region. The vineyard terraces there have been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2007. Christelle Conne's family has been running a winery here for generations and allows the film crew a look into the cellar. Heading south, the train meanders leisurely through the Fribourg region. After the tunnel at Puidoux, a wonderful view opens up to the train passenger: In the foreground the vineyards of Lavaux, behind them the blue shimmer of Lake Geneva, and in the distance the snow-covered slopes of Mont Blanc.

Sunday, 2 January

SWR Television, 4.30 p.m.

100 Years of Winegrowing in the Southwest
Of myths and machines

Vines, wine and the winegrowers characterise the culture and landscape in the Southwest. Rhineland-Palatinate and Baden-Württemberg are the homelands of German wine. For the first time, a 90-minute SWR television documentary reflects this comprehensively, with archive footage that is in part almost 100 years old. It shows the once hard manual work of the winegrowers and the development of viticulture.

Monday, 3 January

WDR Television, 1.55 p.m.

Of all things - sparkling wine

Germans are the biggest lovers of sparkling wine in the world. Of the approximately two billion bottles produced each year, one in five is drunk here. Reporter Sven Kroll sets out on a journey and takes a look behind the scenes at Germany's oldest sparkling wine cellar. He learns from a winemaker how sparkling wine is made and what makes it so special. And he goes on a tasting tour with a sommelier. What does sparkling wine cost to produce and why are there such wide price ranges? Can the sommelier distinguish discount sparkling wine from vintner's sparkling wine? And how much are sparkling wine lovers willing to pay for a bottle of sparkling wine? Sven Kroll finds out on his journey for "Ausgerechnet - Sekt".

Tuesday, 4 January

SR Television, 4.45 a.m.

SR retro - Saarland in the Sixties
Wine blessing in Greiveldange, Luxembourg

The fire brigade and village band accompany a procession through the village of Greiveldange in Luxembourg on Boxing Day. The procession includes a barrel of wine, which is blessed in the church.

Wednesday, 5 January

WDR Television, 22.55

ClimateAlarm
Can we still be saved?

At the latest since the flood disaster in North Rhine-Westphalia and in the neighbouring Ahr valley, it should be clear to us: Climate change is not an abstract global phenomenon. It has long been part of our lives. Sebastian Tetzlaff from the wine village of Dernau in the Ahr Valley experiences the worst night of his life on 14 July 2021. His village is devastated, his professional existence is destroyed. For him, climate change becomes a personal tragedy. Almost at the same time, 2,500 kilometres away from the Ahr valley, in a village near Manavgat, Sercan Bayat also experiences his climate tragedy: the Turkish farmer has to watch some of his cows burn alive in devastating forest fires. "The earth is taking revenge because we humans have done so much to it," he says.

Thursday, 6 January

DMAX, 8.50 a.m.

The aquarium pros
An aquarium in the shape of a wine bottle

In this episode, Wayde King and Brett Raymer build an aquarium for a liquor shop. The 5,000 litre tank is installed on a 90 centimetre high base. Swallowtails and red sea doctorfish cavort in the water, swimming through picturesque vineyards. The hilly landscape made of Styrofoam is covered with polygel so that no toxins form. And since wine goes well with fish, customers can also pour it from an integrated tap.

Thursday, 6 January

3sat, 7.20 pm

Kaminer Inside: Germany
In search of a sense of home

In the middle of the Ruhr area, writer Wladimir Kaminer meets wedding planner Tülay Koca, who organises Turkish weddings. In the Geiseltal he visits a winegrower who has planted a vineyard on a former spoil heap and formed a new homeland out of the one that has disappeared.

Wladimir Kaminer (right) in conversation with winemaker Lars Reifert.

ZDF/Johann Schmejkal

Friday, 7 January

Bavarian Television, 11.20 a.m.

Railway Romanticism
The Rheinhessen and their "Bawettchen

Long-time "Eisenbahn-Romantik" presenter Jo Jung sets off for the Rheinhessen region, where he grew up for the most part. With him he carries a picture of the "Bawettchen", which already hung above his childhood bed. He wants to find out more about this lost but not forgotten railway. Until the 1950s, the "Bawettchen" ran between Fürfeld and Sprendlingen. In addition to passengers, it transported agricultural products such as wine and sugar beet.

Friday, 7 January

ARD-alpha, 8.15 p.m.

Countries - People - Adventures
Jordan - Fine Wines

Jordan has many faces: outstanding doctors, lawyers, architects who work all over the world. Highly qualified professionals like Faris, who trains pilots over the Wadi Rum desert. Or like Omar, who, as a successful winemaker in a Muslim country, has reached international quality levels with his red "Saint George".

Saturday, 8 January

3sat, 12.15 p.m.

Salzburg's Local Mountains

Among the secrets of the wintry city forest on the Kapuzinerberg are Europe's only chamois in a city area. They are as unique as the vineyard on the Mönchsberg opposite.

Sunday, 9 January

hr television, 10.10 a.m.

The Vintner King (29)
The Journey 39-part television series, Germany/Austria 2006 - 2010

Thomas Stickler invites his partner Claudia Plattner on a short holiday. He secretly plans to propose to Claudia during these days, far away from all the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Where could this take place more beautifully than in Venice?

Sunday, 9 January

WDR Television, 2.05 p.m.

Beautiful! Rhine Journey
Wine and joie de vivre in the Rheingau

Why is it so beautiful along the Rhine? Wine and good food, picturesque villages and old castles, romance and conviviality - Stefan Pinnow found all this in the Rheingau. He hiked a bit on the Rheinsteig, visited spas in Wiesbaden and immersed himself in the hustle and bustle of Rüdesheim before floating over the vines in a cable car. Eberbach Monastery near Eltville is a synthesis of history, architecture, culture and wine - and was the setting for the film "The Name of the Rose".

Sunday, 9 January

NDR Television, 8.15 p.m.

The North Germans and their mountains

The mountains in northern Germany are also used for economic purposes. Near Bad Iburg as a vineyard and as a quarry near Bad Karlshafen, whose surrounding quarries supplied many a sandstone for the famous buildings of the Weser Renaissance centuries ago. The 75-metre-high mountain near Empelde consists of overburden from the potash industry. Trees and vines now grow on the originally white mountain. A theatre stage attracts visitors to the top.

Monday, 10 January

3sat, 2.05 p.m.

Thailand - A Festival of Colours
The North

From the mountains in the north of Thailand, the journey takes us through rugged rocky landscapes, modern cities and wide valleys - all the way to the wine-growing areas on the edge of the Khao-Yai National Park. There is a refuge for former working elephants, and next door, in the mild mountain climate, winemakers are working on a new kind of wine that can thrive in the tropics.

Monday, 10 January

ARD-alpha, 4.15 p.m.

Newton
Wine - a winner from climate change?
It will be a wine....

Wine seems to be one of the few winners of global climate change. The vine is a heat-loving plant. As temperatures rise, vineyards could expand to northern and higher altitudes. But will this new wine taste good? Will it be economical to produce? What new challenges will winemakers face? "Newton" asked young winemakers and scientists about their strategies for the wine of the future. At the German University of Viticulture Geisenheim, the effects of climate change are being researched with an elaborate outdoor facility. In a circular experimental field, a 20% higher carbon dioxide content is simulated, which is predicted for 2050. Initial results show: Yields could increase, but the plants will become more sensitive to water shortages and pest infestations. Climate change is not only associated with rising temperatures, but also with more frequent weather extremes such as late frosts, heat waves and hailstorms. This makes wine production more expensive: hail nets, soil cultivation, irrigation, intensive foliage work, sophisticated plant protection and the right harvest time are becoming increasingly important to achieve sufficient yields and the desired aromas. New varieties are becoming necessary, explains vine breeder Ferdinand Regner of the Federal School of Viticulture in Klosterneuburg: "We don't yet have any new varieties that have been bred especially for climate change, but we have experimental plants that would have been too late to ripen in the past, but now fit quite well."

Tuesday, 11 January

ARD-alpha, 1.30 p.m.

Next exit - Kaiserstuhl

Following in the footsteps of the cult series "Links und rechts der Autobahn" (Left and Right of the Motorway), a journey through time begins, back to 1963. The film shows the developments and caesuras up to the present day and the people who have had a decisive influence on the region in question. When a film about the Kaiserstuhl was made in 1965, no one suspected that ten years later vintners and citizens would rise up against the planned Wyhl nuclear power plant with the phrase "nai hämmer gsait" ("we said no") - a phrase that is representative of civil resistance to this day. Some fifty years after this series was broadcast, "next exit - Kaiserstuhl" trawls through the past 50 years of history of this wine country, which belongs to category "B" - like Champagne. Since 2005, an oversized wooden chair, seven metres high, in the "Gestühl" district of Leiselheim has been a reminder of the name of this stretch of land. According to legend, Otto III sat in court here when he was passing through, hence the name "Kaiserstuhl". Many vineyards were terraced in the 1970s for better cultivation, visually a serious incision into the landscape formed by volcanoes. Limiting the quantity of grapes grown has also ensured that first-class wines are produced on this patch of land. Where good wine grows, master chefs also like to settle. There are now two restaurants in the Kaiserstuhl, each with a Michelin star. But farmers are also plagued by worries. Many winegrowers are looking for successors when their children go their separate ways. And the lovely countryside, a tourist stronghold, could be adversely affected since certification in fruit-growing came into effect. More and more part-time farmers are giving up, because they have to pay just as much as the big ones every year, and they have to deal with a lot of bureaucracy. So far, they have not stood up to the authorities. The alternative to fruit growing is called seed maize. How boring it looks and how much it pollutes the groundwater with nitrates can be seen a few kilometres away in Alsace.

Wednesday, 12 January

SWR Television, 21.00

The Ahr Valley after the Flood - First Devastated, Then Forgotten

Environmental journalist and SWR reporter Tobias Koch has long been concerned with climate change. But the fact that such an event happens here in Germany and that water causes such damage also makes him very thoughtful. On his journey through the Ahr valley, he meets the people behind the catastrophe, such as the Ahr vintner Michael Kriechel. He drives through a valley that even months after the flood still looks like a disaster area in parts.

SWR reporter Tobias Koch (right) helps Ahr vintner Michael Kriechel with the grape harvest.

SWR

Thursday, 13 January

SWR Television, 6.15 p.m.

The recipe seeker in Weinstadt-Endersbach

SWR recipe seeker Susanne Nett has been hunting for special and almost forgotten recipes for years. Every now and then she finds dishes that are not to everyone's taste. Some of the things people used to like to eat are rarely served today. This time, the main role is played by a small animal that used to be common in the vineyards of the Rems valley: the snail. Today it has become rare and is protected. Only farmed snails are allowed to be eaten. Therefore, the search for the Remstäler Schneckensüpple becomes a challenge for the recipe seeker. Who still knows this old recipe and who is willing to cook it with her in their kitchen? Where do you get the farmed snails for it?

Susanne Nett (right) cooks the Remstäler Schneckensüpple together with Jana Fackelmayer today.

SWR

Friday, 14 January

ARD-alpha, 8.15 p.m.

alpha-retro (1976)
The dream of the motor

Programme about a South Tyrolean winegrower who is a racing enthusiast.

Sunday, 16 January

hr television, 10.10 hrs

The Vintner King (30)
Plans for the Future 39-part television series, Germany/Austria 2006 - 2010

The third season with 13 new episodes about the "Winzerkönig" and his family promises exciting but also dramatic times. Harald Krassnitzer as winegrower Thomas Stickler will passionately continue the fight for the preservation of the family business and give the supposed winegrower idyll at Lake Neusiedl a very special character. It is above all a tragic accident that throws all plans for the future out of kilter. The attacks of envious people do the rest; and finally "The Vintner King" has to defend himself against slander and intrigues.

Sunday, 16 January

SWR Television, 10.45 a.m.

The Beer Pioneers
The Unstoppable Triumph of German Brewery Families in the USA

In the middle of the 19th century, Eberhard Anheuser from Kreuznach and Adolphus Busch from Mainz-Kastel emigrate to the USA. There they founded a brewery that became the largest and most successful in America: Budweiser. Together with other brewers from the Southwest, they bring German beer culture to the USA and become rich and respected citizens there, despite the Civil War, Prohibition and other obstacles. It is a success story of people who had to leave their homeland because of hardship and lack of prospects and made their fortune in a foreign country. In 1920, Prohibition comes to the USA, banning the brewing of beer. Many breweries had to close. It was not until 1933, after the end of Prohibition, that things started to look up again. The breweries that survived grew to new size. Many remain family-owned for a long time, but over time most are sold to beverage companies - including Anheuser and Busch. Nevertheless, the memory of the history of German immigrants is still present in the USA. It is considered a successful example of the integration of people who fled hardship and a lack of prospects and found happiness in America.

Sunday, 16 January

arte, 6.25 p.m.

Cuisine Royale
At El Rincón Castle

It is impossible to imagine Europe's aristocratic houses without fine dining in elegant company. But even beyond the grand menus, people eat and cook at court. The documentary series takes a look around the kitchens and dining rooms of the high nobility, where simple local delicacies are served alongside gala dinners. In Toledo, the home of Carlos Falcó's family, Marqués de Griñón, large processions take place during Semana Santa, Holy Week. Members of the brotherhoods then carry decorated statues of Christ and Mary through the streets. Holy Week is accompanied by special fasting meals. After Easter, olive and wine producer, author and patron of the arts Carlos Falcó and his daughter Xandra invite guests from Spain's cultural world to a gala dinner at his castle. For them, star chef Adolfo Muñoz conjures up dishes that bring out the Marqués' award-winning olive oil. The agricultural engineer, non-fiction author, art connoisseur and wine and olive oil producer secretly brought new grape varieties to Spain and invented irrigation methods for which he was initially ridiculed. Today, his wines are internationally recognised, and his olive oil is repeatedly at the top of relevant best lists.

Carlos Falcó, Marqués de Griñón and Marqués de Castel-Moncayo, in front of his castle El Rincón

Martin Pflüger

Sunday, 16 January

SWR Television, 9.00 p.m.

Dream Destinations: The Danube - From the Wachau to Hungary

Viewers learn from two winemaker brothers how the Danube influences the aroma of wine in the Wachau region.

Monday, 17 January

3sat, 2.00 p.m.

Slovenia - Travelling in the Land of Legends and Myths

Slovenia is the land of 1,000 faces. In a very small area you will find wonderful landscapes that could not be more different. There are, for example, the high mountain peaks of the Julian Alps with gorges and river valleys, fascinating caves and karst areas or cheerful wine villages and picturesque coastal towns like the Venetian-like Piran.

Monday, 17 January

Bavarian Television, 8.15 p.m.

Home of the records

Presenter Claudia Pupeter takes viewers on a journey of wonder through the whole of Bavaria. In this episode, Claudia Pupeter again discovers impressive best performances, including a world record and a world record attempt, all from Bavaria. This time two familiar faces are visiting: Michl Müller and Sebastian Reich with his Amanda engage in an exciting duel in the vineyard, with everything revolving around Franconian wine. The "Würzburger Stein" vineyard is a record-breaking site in itself, making it the perfect venue for the "wine duel" between Michl Müller and Sebastian Reich. Who is the better wine connoisseur?

Wednesday, 19 January

SWR Television, 3.30 p.m.

Planet School
Geo-Tour
The Kaiserstuhl

The Kaiserstuhl - a small, island-like elevation in the middle of the Upper Rhine Graben, is known for good wines and sunny weather. Beneath its surface, the Kaiserstuhl hides an unusual history of its formation. Even during a relaxing fango treatment, geology is at play. But the volcanic rock phonolite not only provides the raw material for wellness treatments, it also produces mystical sounds. Other treasures await discovery in the soil of the Kaiserstuhl: from aromatic truffles to beautiful crystals. Birds travel here from the savannahs of Africa to make their nesting cavities in the loess soil. But how was loess formed in the first place?

Thursday, 20 January

NDR television, 21.00

Greece's Green Fingers
The Halkidiki Peninsula

On Athos, Father Epifanios is the superstar among the monks: To market his exquisite wine, he sometimes travels to fairs in France and Germany. He has also written a cookbook with old recipes from the completely independent and strictly sealed monastic republic, with a print run of 300,000 copies. The Monastic Kitchen of Chalkidiki is a bestseller.

Friday, 21 January

SWR Television, 6.15 p.m.

Go there
Hildegard is alive! Around Bingen

Bingen - the name of the Rhineland-Palatinate town stands not only for Rhine romance, but above all for Saint Hildegard. Around 900 years ago, the most important woman of the Middle Ages, Hildegard of Bingen, drew attention to herself and left her mark. In the vineyards of Bingen, the young winemaker Frederike Dessoy is on her way. The 30-year-old has been running her own winery together with her father for ten years. Yet neither of them had any idea about winegrowing before. The winemaker talks about tears in the cellar and the advantage of jumping into cold water. From Bingen, a trip to the Upper Middle Rhine Valley World Heritage Site is a good idea. The river is surrounded by steep slopes and castles. One of the most beautiful is Rheinstein Castle. Castle owner Markus Hecher knows every nook and cranny there. When he moved in with his father in the 1970s, the castle was falling into disrepair. In the beautiful rose garden, Hecher reveals what one of the vines has to do with Saint Hildegard.

Friday, 21 January

hr television, 21.00

Bordeaux and France's Southwest
Where connoisseurs are at home

In France, it has long been rumoured that Bordeaux is a serious rival to Paris. Bordeaux produced the philosophers Michel de Montaigne and Montesquieu, its architecture is a prime example of classicism, and it is the world capital of wine. A visit to the wine museum "Cité du Vin" is a must. Christine Seemann turns her back on the coast and heads east into the heart of the Bordelais to Saint Émilion. The gently hilly wine-growing region was the first to be put on the UNESCO World Heritage List. For Saint Émilion is a synthesis of the arts, as it nestles picturesquely into the landscape, full of enchanted corners and architectural treasures. And wine is the elixir of life around which everything revolves. In September, the Jurade, the wine fraternity, gives permission for the grape harvest - a cause for celebration. This spectacle enchants not only wine lovers.

Friday, 21 January

Bavarian Television, 10.00 p.m.

Cheeky & Free Retro
The best of the Närrische Weinprobe

Since 2003, BR has been showing the "Närrische Weinprobe" (Foolish Wine Tasting) to kick off the TV carnival. This is where carnival greats such as Matthias Walz and Michl Müller made their first appearances - these and many other funny impressions from the wine cellar can be seen again. Together with cult jester Oti Schmelzer, we will look back on the "historical" moments of the "Foolish Wine Tasting". This much can be revealed: Frech & Frei Retro" will take you on a journey back in time to the beginnings of the programme - including cabaret, jokes and a good laugh!

Saturday, 22 January

arte, 8.10 a.m.

GEO Reportage: France's Winegrowers
Tradition meets passion

France, the land of wine: hills full of vines characterise the landscape in many regions, and the product is just as diverse. But in some places the cultivation methods have exhausted the vineyards, time and again clearing has to be done even in traditional growing areas. Some winegrowers are taking new paths, they want to change their production to counter the decline of wine culture - with unusual ideas, with a sense of tradition and in harmony with nature. One who is fighting against the dying of the vineyards in France is the vine grower Lilian Bérillon. He owns a nursery in Villeneuve-lès-Avignon, a small community in the south of France. His profession is rather unknown, and yet it is crucial when it comes to the survival of plants: the quality of the vines he breeds determines the quality of the grapes that will later grow on them. "The situation is quite serious: in the past, vines were planted to last 80 to 100 years, but today they only have a lifespan of 20 to 30 years - modern viticulture bears part of the responsibility for this," says Lilian. He maintains close relationships with the winegrowers and travels to wineries all over the country to develop customised solutions. The Beaujolais wine region north of Lyon is also going through a turbulent time. The controversial quality of Beaujolais Nouveau has led an entire region into crisis. Here, Julien Merle, a young winemaker in the fifth generation, has broken with previous cultivation practices. Together with his partner Nathalie, he is once again working in the rural tradition: organically, without chemicals. The result is young natural wines that are in vogue not only in France but worldwide. Will the "young wild ones" prevail on the wine market?

Saturday, 22 January

hr television, 10.30 p.m.

Toronto and environs
From the metropolis to Niagara Falls

Twenty kilometres north of Niagara Falls, where the Niagara River flows into Lake Ontario, lies the Niagara wine region with the historic village of Niagara-on-the-Lake. There it seems as if time stands still. It is a region known for Canada's famous ice wine. The Iniskillin Winery in the province of Ontario has often won awards for its top wines.

Sunday, 23 January

hr television, 2.45 p.m.

Bordeaux and France's Southwest
Where connoisseurs are at home

In France, it has long been rumoured that Bordeaux is a serious rival to Paris. Bordeaux produced the philosophers Michel de Montaigne and Montesquieu, its architecture is a prime example of classicism, and it is the world capital of wine. A visit to the wine museum "Cité du Vin" is a must. Christine Seemann turns her back on the coast and heads east into the heart of the Bordelais to Saint Émilion. The gently hilly wine-growing region was the first to be put on the UNESCO World Heritage List. For Saint Émilion is a synthesis of the arts, as it nestles picturesquely into the landscape, full of enchanted corners and architectural treasures. And wine is the elixir of life around which everything revolves. In September, the Jurade, the wine fraternity, gives permission for the grape harvest - a cause for celebration. This spectacle enchants not only wine lovers.

Sunday, 23 January

arte, 6.25 p.m.

Cuisine Royale
At Tokaj Castle

When the time of the grape harvest approaches, it is the most beautiful time for Arno Wimpffen and his wife Katinka Kékessy-Wimpffen. For weeks, local Roma families, who have been practising the trade for generations, harvest the vines on the family's estate in Tokaj. The Wimpffen family then likes to invite relatives and friends to a festive harvest meal prepared by local chef Csaba Putnoki Nagy. In addition to wines from their own vineyards, regional specialities are served. Arno Wimpffen comes from a traditional Austrian noble family. He lives north of Vienna with his wife and three children and runs a forestry business there. In 1997, the couple took over the Patricius winery in Tokaj. The volcanic soils and the moisture that flows from the rivers Tisza and Bodrog over the vineyards favour the cultivation of grapes there. The region has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site for several years.

Peter Molnar is the manager of the winery in Tokaj.

Stefan Pannen

Monday, 24 January

hr television, 1.45 p.m.

The Vintner King (31)
The Crisis Germany/Austria 2006 - 2010

The third season with 13 new episodes about the "Winzerkönig" and his family promises exciting but also dramatic times. Harald Krassnitzer as winegrower Thomas Stickler will passionately continue the fight for the preservation of the family business and give the supposed winegrower idyll at Lake Neusiedl a very special character. It is above all a tragic accident that throws all plans for the future out of kilter. The attacks of envious people do the rest; and finally "The Vintner King" has to defend himself against slander and intrigues.

Tuesday, 25 January

hr television, 21.00

Experience Hesse: Rheingau wine on new paths

The Rheingau and its wine have often been sung about - and filmed almost as often. Despite all the idylls and clichés: time has not stood still in this region. Even in the Rheingau, residents - and above all the winegrowers - have to face new challenges. These include dealing with the clearly noticeable climate change as well as the search for modern forms of production and marketing. In addition, the Rheingau and its wine have become a bit "multicultural" and globalised. The film observes how the wine develops right up to the pressing stage and accompanies winegrowers in their work.

Tuesday, 25 January

hr television, 21.45

Glorious Hesse
On the road in and around Lorch in the Rheingau region

This time Dieter Voss is on his way to Lorch in the Rheingau. The westernmost town in Hessen lies on the Rhine and is famous for its wonderful Riesling wine. No trip to the Rheingau is complete without culinary delights: At the traditional Mohr wine estate, the winegrower's wife Saynur Sonkaya-Neher conjures up Turkish delights on the table. She serves matching wines from the vineyard's steep slopes - a successful combination.

Thursday, 27 January

3sat, 11.45 a.m.

Served up on Sunday - The Strudengau

The Strudengau section of the Danube: no two kilometres of flow are alike, each bears its own distinctive character and has its own history. This also applies to the region's viticulture with the Chardonnay and Zweigelt grape varieties.

Friday, 28 January

ARD-alpha, 1.30 p.m.

Railway Romanticism
Railway Stories from Burgenland

Round trip with landscape portrait around Lake Neusiedl from Sopron in Hungary to Eisenstadt in Austria. The focus is on the Pannonian Plain in Hungary and the Austrian Burgenland. Wine and vastness around Lake Neusiedl and in the middle of it all the railway.

Friday, 28 January

Bavarian Television, 8.15 p.m.

The Foolish Wine Tasting from the State Court Cellar in Würzburg, 2022

The "Närrische Weinprobe" (Foolish Wine Tasting) from the State Court Cellar of the Residenz in Würzburg offers genuine Franconian originals. This wine tasting of a special kind is presented by Martin Rassau, supported by Franconian cabaret artists. The Franconians are serious: contrary to the saying, here you actually go to the cellar to laugh, or more precisely: to the Staatlicher Hofkeller zu Würzburg under the Residenz. Here, between centuries-old wooden barrels, people celebrate, laugh and, of course, taste good wine. The host is Martin Rassau from the Comödie Fürth. Well-known artists from the Franconian carnival scene such as Michl Müller, Doris Paul and Thomas Väth will be there. But the "Närrische Weinprobe" also offers young talent a chance to prove themselves on the TV stage.

Saturday, 29 January

SWR Television, 3.00 p.m.

Land - Love - Air
The Wine Rebel

Sometimes it all seems like a dream to her. Juliane Eller from Alsheim is something like the shooting star among German female winegrowers. At the age of only 23, she took over her parents' vineyard and, despite the financial risk, radically restructured the business. That was six years ago. Since then, a new wind has been blowing at the winery - quality instead of mass. The winemaker's daughter relies on organic guidelines and manual harvesting. She has created her own line of wines, Juwel wines. But nothing works without the family. Juliane is glad that her parents Thomas and Ingrid are still involved. And grandma Katharina takes care of the physical well-being at the winery. For her wine marketing, Juliane Eller used social media from the very beginning; after all, she belongs to the Instagram generation. She also wants to interest younger people in German quality wine. The young winemaker from Rheinhessen succeeded in inspiring presenter Joko Winterscheidt. He convinced his friend, actor Matthias Schweighöfer, to join in. Today, the three of them market their joint "3Freunde wine". But success has its price: besides working in the vineyard, Juliane Eller is now constantly on the road. Sometimes too much.

Juliane Eller in her vineyard. The winemaker's daughter has radically turned her parents' vineyard around and relies on organic guidelines and hand harvesting. With Juwel wines, she has created her own line of wines.

SWR

Sunday, 30 January

hr television, 7.30 a.m.

Treasures of the world
The Wine Terraces of Lavaux
Spoiled by three suns - Switzerland

The wine-growing region of Lavaux between Lausanne and Vevey is considered one of the most beautiful landscapes in Switzerland. The mighty rock faces of the Savoy and Vaud Alps protect it from cold winds, and Lac Léman - Lake Geneva - which is over three hundred metres deep, provides a mild climate. Even the Romans planted vines on the steep shore slopes. In the Middle Ages, Cistercian monks began to build terraces fortified with masonry, thus increasing the quality and yield of the vines. Despite the use of modern techniques, viticulture in Lavaux is still extremely laborious today due to the steep slopes. To facilitate cultivation, dizzying monorails were built to transport people and materials up to the upper terraces. The steepest slopes are those of Dézaley, which were formed by the Rhone glacier. The clay and chalky soil gives the wines - especially the Chasselas (Gutedel) its typical taste. The Lavaux with its mountains, lake, vineyards and settlements forms a unique cultural landscape. This is why it was inscribed on Unesco's World Heritage List in 2007.

Sunday, 30 January

hr television, 2.45 p.m.

Dream Tours through Spain
On the road in the north, east, west

The centre of Galicia is world-famous: Santiago de Compostela. Its cathedral marks the end of the Way of St. James and is the destination of countless pilgrims. Hundreds arrive here every day in winter, thousands from all over the world in summer. In the search for inner contemplation, no one who does not want to do so has to starve - physical pleasures play an important role along the famous route: there is the wine from Rioja, the good cheese from Asturias' mountains, and there are special biscuits made of chestnut flour. The destination region, the Spanish province of Galicia, is touristically developed but not overcrowded. The rieras, river estuaries that often stretch dozens of kilometres inland, characterise the sometimes mountainous landscape. In the riera of Cambados, mussel gatherers search for seafood, and on the gentle slopes grows the Albariño, an excellent white wine that goes well with the fish dishes of the region.

Monday, 31 January

hr television, 1.45 p.m.

The Vintner King (32)
End and beginning 39-part television series, Germany/Austria 2006 - 2010

Johanna, Thomas Stickler's divorced wife, offers Thomas her help and works in the business. She meets the wine merchant Strasser and the two become closer.

Monday, 31 January

3sat, 8.15 pm

Florence - Habsburg and the Beauty on the Arno

Alessandro François' ancestors settled in Tuscany in 1740 out of loyalty to the imperial house. Since the late 19th century, the family has devoted itself to winegrowing in the Chianti region around the Castello di Querceto castle. Alessandro François leads director Gernot Stadler through his vineyards and tells of the time when his ancestors were still loyal servants of the grand dukes.

Tuesday, 1 February

3sat, 4.05 p.m.

Florence - Habsburg and the Beauty on the Arno

Alessandro François' ancestors settled in Tuscany in 1740 out of loyalty to the imperial house. Since the late 19th century, the family has devoted itself to winegrowing in the Chianti region around the Castello di Querceto castle. Alessandro François leads director Gernot Stadler through his vineyards and tells of the time when his ancestors were still loyal servants of the grand dukes.

Programme changes at short notice are possible.

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